Ontario Distracted Driving Law – Extension of Exemption

The amateur radio exemption to Ontario’s distracted driving law has been extended until 1 January, 2021 (see below).


ONTARIO REGULATION 475/17

made under the

HIGHWAY TRAFFIC ACT

Made: December 12, 2017
Filed: December 12, 2017
Published on e-Laws: December 12, 2017
Printed in The Ontario Gazette: December 30, 2017

Amending O. Reg. 366/09

(DISPLAY SCREENS AND HAND-HELD DEVICES)

  1. Subsection 11 (3) of Ontario Regulation 366/09 is amended by striking out “January 1, 2018” and substituting “January 1, 2021”.
  2. Subsection 12 (4) of the Regulation is amended by striking out “January 1, 2018” and substituting “January 1, 2021”.
  3. Subsection 13 (2) of the Regulation is amended by striking out “January 1, 2018” and substituting “January 1, 2021”.

Commencement

  1. This Regulation comes into force on the day it is filed.

Made by:
Pris par :

Le ministre des Transports,

Steven Del Duca

Minister of Transportation

Date made: December 12, 2017
Pris le : 12 décembre 2017

****************************************************************************************************


(4)
 This section is revoked on January 1, 2018.  O. Reg. 366/09, s. 12 (4), O. Reg. 253/12, s. 2 (3).

Time-limited exemption for amateur radio operators

  1. (1)Drivers who hold a valid radio operator certificate issued under the Radiocommunication Act (Canada) may drive a motor vehicle on a highway while holding or using a two-way radio.  O. Reg. 366/09, s. 13 (1), O. Reg. 253/12, s. 3 (1).

IARU Region 2 Bandplan

As part of the XIX IARU Region 2 General Assembly in Viña del Mar, Chile, a new Band Plan for Region 2 was approved on October 14, 2016 during.  The document is published on the IARU Region 2 website in English and Spanish.

The changes aimed at harmonization with Regions 1 and 3, recognizance of some band occupations in Region 2 and the contextualization of the satellite segments to encourage the use of new technologies in space communications.

The main modifications are:

  • Introduction of the 60 m allocation with sub-bands, footnotes and definitions harmonized with Region 1;
  • The inclusion of ACDS in 2200 m, restriction of bandwidth in 630 m, harmonization of the 160 m and 80 m, especially on digital sub-bands;
  • Recognition of the calling frequency 144.3 MHz in 2 m and AM practice in 15 m;
  • Editorial changes in the footnotes related to ACDS, additional footnotes related to AM and editorial changes in some of the footnotes, modes and bandwidths of satellites sub-bands.

The Band Plan does not have an enforcement power per se but serves as a guide to the Member Societies. According the IARU Region 2 Band Plan “it is suggested that Member Societies, in coordination with the authorities, incorporate it [the Band Plan] in their regulations and promote widely with their amateur radio communities”.

RAC was represented at the meetings in Chile by Glenn MacDonnel VE3XRA.

73 de Norm VE3LC

We Must Stop The New Zoning Bylaw Now!

Amateur Radio Antennas Targeted by Ottawa’s New Zoning Bylaw — A MUST READ for ALL Radio Amateurs!!!!!

The FIRST draft of the proposed New Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw was finally posted on the city’s website on May 26, 2006, after several months of delay. There are three sections of it that specifically mention (target) amateur radio antennas: Sections 55, 64 and 120.

The radio amateur’s ability to communicate over distance is only as good as his antennas. Does Ottawa want to shoot itself in the foot in times of emergency by severely restricting antennas usage and heights??

Please click on the header page labeled “New Zoning Bylaw” for more information and to keep up-to-date on the latest meetings proceedings. Your Webmaster will be postings all relevant information and comments on that page ON A DAILY BASIS!!!

WE MUST CHANGE THE NEW BYLAW NOW!!!!!!!!!

The following comments are from Ernie VE3EJJ

The draft of the proposed New Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw was finally posted on the city’s website on May 26, 2006, after several months of delay. There are three sections of it that specifically mention (target) amateur radio antennas: Sections 55, 64 and 120.

  • Section 55 deals with accessory uses, buildings and structures. It specifies minimum setbacks from lot lines for various structures such as wind turbines etc., but specifically states that it does not apply to accessory satellite dishes or accessory amateur radio antennas in residential zones, these being regulated by section 120.
  • Section 64, permitted projections above the height limit, lists many items such as barns, silos, bridges, chimneys or smokes stacks, steeples, bell towers, equipment penthouses, flag poles, solar panels, television, radio or telecommunication antennas, but specifically excludes satellite dish or amateur radio antennas accessory to a permitted use in a residential zone.
  • Section 120, accessory satellite dish or accessory amateur radio antenna in a residential zone, lays out the permitted conditions of use in tabular form. As to location, a satellite dish greater than 1 meter in diameter or an amateur radio antenna may be located on a building that is a minimum of 3 stories or 13.5 m (closely 45 feet) in height. They may not be located in a yard abutting a public street.

The minimum setback from any lot line is 1.2 m for the dish but for the antenna a distance of ½ the height above grade of the antenna, but no less than 3m (10 feet). For the antenna the setback applies to a tower, a foundation etc. but excludes guy wires.

The maximum permitted height including the support structure is 3.7 m for the dish, excluding the height of the building if roof-mounted. For the antenna the permitted height is the same as the maximum permitted height of the principal building. (In many residential zones the limit is 11 m).

And the kicker – maximum number of antennas permitted per lot is ONE

It is obvious that the drafter of these provisions does not appreciate the technical niceties of antenna resonance requirements or the fact of amateur bands. Also, he does not distinguished between the different basic types of antennas, although it is obvious that the main concern is about towers and beams.

It is equally obvious that the local amateur community has an educational job to do with the public and more specifically with the drafters of this bylaw. The provided avenue for this is the public meetings being held to receive comments on the draft bylaw.