We Must Stop The New Zoning Bylaw Now!

Amateur Radio Antennas Targeted by Ottawa’s New Zoning Bylaw — A MUST READ for ALL Radio Amateurs!!!!!

The FIRST draft of the proposed New Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw was finally posted on the city’s website on May 26, 2006, after several months of delay. There are three sections of it that specifically mention (target) amateur radio antennas: Sections 55, 64 and 120.

The radio amateur’s ability to communicate over distance is only as good as his antennas. Does Ottawa want to shoot itself in the foot in times of emergency by severely restricting antennas usage and heights??

Please click on the header page labeled “New Zoning Bylaw” for more information and to keep up-to-date on the latest meetings proceedings. Your Webmaster will be postings all relevant information and comments on that page ON A DAILY BASIS!!!

WE MUST CHANGE THE NEW BYLAW NOW!!!!!!!!!

The following comments are from Ernie VE3EJJ

The draft of the proposed New Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw was finally posted on the city’s website on May 26, 2006, after several months of delay. There are three sections of it that specifically mention (target) amateur radio antennas: Sections 55, 64 and 120.

  • Section 55 deals with accessory uses, buildings and structures. It specifies minimum setbacks from lot lines for various structures such as wind turbines etc., but specifically states that it does not apply to accessory satellite dishes or accessory amateur radio antennas in residential zones, these being regulated by section 120.
  • Section 64, permitted projections above the height limit, lists many items such as barns, silos, bridges, chimneys or smokes stacks, steeples, bell towers, equipment penthouses, flag poles, solar panels, television, radio or telecommunication antennas, but specifically excludes satellite dish or amateur radio antennas accessory to a permitted use in a residential zone.
  • Section 120, accessory satellite dish or accessory amateur radio antenna in a residential zone, lays out the permitted conditions of use in tabular form. As to location, a satellite dish greater than 1 meter in diameter or an amateur radio antenna may be located on a building that is a minimum of 3 stories or 13.5 m (closely 45 feet) in height. They may not be located in a yard abutting a public street.

The minimum setback from any lot line is 1.2 m for the dish but for the antenna a distance of ½ the height above grade of the antenna, but no less than 3m (10 feet). For the antenna the setback applies to a tower, a foundation etc. but excludes guy wires.

The maximum permitted height including the support structure is 3.7 m for the dish, excluding the height of the building if roof-mounted. For the antenna the permitted height is the same as the maximum permitted height of the principal building. (In many residential zones the limit is 11 m).

And the kicker – maximum number of antennas permitted per lot is ONE

It is obvious that the drafter of these provisions does not appreciate the technical niceties of antenna resonance requirements or the fact of amateur bands. Also, he does not distinguished between the different basic types of antennas, although it is obvious that the main concern is about towers and beams.

It is equally obvious that the local amateur community has an educational job to do with the public and more specifically with the drafters of this bylaw. The provided avenue for this is the public meetings being held to receive comments on the draft bylaw.